Lowbrow art (pop surrealism)

Dernierement en surfant sur le net j`ai decouvert un mouvement artistique  qui m`a pas mal interesse;)->:le « lowbrow art » que l`on appelle aussi « pop surrealisme ».J`ai dabord decouvert le site de Lori early que j`ai bien aime,apres ca j`ai trouve totalement par hasard  celui du peintre mark ryden ,de la je suis passee a celui de marion peck…Ray Ceasar et ainsi de suite..Que d`aventures!;)..Et j`ai finalement decouvert que tous ces artistes faisaient partie d`un meme mouvement:–> »lowbrow art »!

 et donc 1 petit copy paste wikipedia pour + d`infos:(..surtout pour moi..vs etes pas obliges de tout lire;)si vous voulez skippez ce ptit historique et descendez au bas de la page pour quelques exemples de peintures…j`ai fait un ptit inventaire des artistes que j`ai aime )

 

Lowbrow, or lowbrow art, describes an underground visual art movement that arose in the Los Angeles, California, area in the late 1970s. Lowbrow is a widespread populist art movement with origins in the underground comix world, punk music, hot-rod street culture, and other California subcultures. It is also often known by the name pop surrealism.

Most lowbrow artworks are paintings, but there are also toys, and sculptures.

 

The first artists to create what came to be known as lowbrow art were underground cartoonists: Robert Williams and Gary Panter. Early shows were in alternative galleries in Los Angeles such as La Luz de Jesus run by Billy Shire and the Rico and Julie Rico Gallery in Santa Monica, California. The movement steadily grew from its beginning, with hundreds of artists adopting this style. The lowbrow magazine Juxtapoz by Robert Williams, begun in 1994, has been a mainstay of writing on lowbrow art, and has helped direct and grow the movement.

Writers have noted that there are now distinctions to be drawn between how lowbrow manifests itself in different regions and places. Some see a distinct U.S. « west coast » lowbrow style, which is more heavily influenced by underground comix and hot rod car-culture than elsewhere. As the lowbrow style has spread around the world, it has been intermingled with the tendencies in the visual arts of those places in which it has established itself. As lowbrow develops there may be a branching – as there was with previous art movements – into different strands and even whole new art movements.

Lowbrow is also commonly referred to as pop surrealism. Kirsten Anderson, who edited the book Pop Surrealism, considers lowbrow and pop surrealism to be related but distinct movements. [1] However, Matt Dukes Jordan, author of Weirdo Deluxe, views the terms as interchangeable.

Museums, art critics, mainstream galleries, etc., have been uncertain as to the status of lowbrow in relation to the fine art world, and to date it has been largely excluded – although this has not stopped some collectors from buying the works. Some art critics doubt that lowbrow is a « legitimate » art movement, and there is thus very little scholarly critical writing about it. The standard argument of critics is that critical writing arises naturally from within an art movement first, and then a wider circle of critics draws upon this writing to inform their own criticism. This apparent absence of internal critical writing may be because many lowbrow artists began their careers in fields not normally considered fine art, such as illustration, tattooing and comic books, and/or do not have a university degree in fine art.[citation needed] Many lowbrow artists are self-taught, which further alienates them from the world of museum curators and art schools.

Many in the art world have deeper difficulties with lowbrow’s figurative focus, its cultivation of narrative, and its strong valuing of technical skill.[citation needed] All these aspects of art were deeply disparaged in the art schools and by curators and critics throughout the 1980s and 90s.[citation needed]

However, a number of artists who started their careers by showing in lowbrow galleries have gone on to show their work primarily in mainstream fine art galleries. Mark Ryden (from his 2007 ‘Tree Show’ exhibition), Robert Williams, Manuel Ocampo, Georganne Deen, and the Clayton Brothers are examples.

Echoes of lowbrow’s approach can be found in the art history of the 20th century, beginning with the work of the Dadaists and the leading proponents of the American Regionalism movement (artists like Marcel Duchamp and Thomas Hart Benton) in which such art movements have questioned the distinctions between high and low art, fine art and folk art, and popular culture and high-art culture. In some sense lowbrow art is about exploring and critiquing those distinctions, and it thus shares similarities with the pop art of the 1960s and early 70s. One can also note that just as the lowbrow artists play in the blurred (or perhaps evaporated) boundaries between high and low culture, other more « mainstream » contemporary artists use artistic strategies similar to those employed by lowbrow artists. Examples include: Lisa Yuskavage, Kelly D. Williams, Kenny Scharf, Takashi Murakami, Jim Shaw, John Currin, Mike Kelley, and the San Francisco-based Mission School, which includes Barry McGee and Margaret Kilgallen.

Favourite Lowbrow artists:)

         www.markryden.com              

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(quelques unes de ses oeuvres en couverture de mag mais il faut aller sur on site officiel pour voir toutes ses peintures.. )

 www.marionpeck.com

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lillg.jpg

www.rayceasar.com

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www.loriearly.com

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www.seonnahong.com

(The gears turn and shift in Seonna Hong’s career as an artist and animation art director. After graduating from California State University Long Beach, she spent several rewarding years teaching art to children. In 1999, she made the transition into the animation industry and in 2004 Seonna received an Emmy Award for Individual Achievement in Background Styling for her work on « My Life as a Teenage Robot » (Nickelodeon). She continues to keep her plate full with national and international gallery shows and in 2005, released her first moving picture book, « Animus » (Baby Tattoo Books).)

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